The Most Metal Moment in 3D Printing

The Morning Star is an an incarnation of beauty and danger. It is a 3D-printed sculpture of wood and steel, built by myself in collaboration with ExOne. It weighs about 15 pounds. The sphere of points is about 7.5 inches in diameter. It was printed in four pieces, and the chain portion was printed all at once. The craftsmen at ExOne polished up the points and gave it a nice dark patina for an aged look. The handle was CNC cut from mahogany in five radial sections. The base was CNC cut from oak. Both wood sections were finished with natural oils.

The spike ball design, created in Wings3D

The raw printed parts

 

Attaching the printed chain

Carefully brazing the chain

Polishing the points

Applying the dark patina

Milling the handle

The completed Morning star on its display base

The Morning Star was featured in the art gallery at the Rapid 3D-printing Conference. It got a great response, and I’m proud to say it was the only piece without a “Do Not Touch” sign. In fact, I ensured there was a signing asking for interaction- this is tactile art!

Afterward, I had a concept to have this brutal piece, made of one of the strongest 3D-printed materials, interact with one of the weakest materials- uninfiltrated Zcorp prints made of gypsum powder. Without reinforcing resin, those parts are very fragile and take great care to move without damage. I created a mesh of the Skull from the Visible Human dataset, and shaded reddish brown it with ambient occlusion in Meshlab. This darkened the crevices and made the entire inside dark red. The skull is life-size and took a lot of work to empty the loose powder from the small holes.

From there, I had a plan to modify the greenhouse in my backyard into a Smash House. I credit Whit, my roommate at the time, for the creative name for this structure dedicated to smashing things with a big metal spike ball.

Welcome to the Smash House

The side of the greenhouse was cut away, the bare frame was painted firecracker red, and a platform was built on the side to mount several cameras. I bought a special camera capable of filming up to 1000 frames per second, though it was used in the 240 fps mode to maintain decent resolution. A hinged apparatus was built to support the morning star, and also to mount a first-person view camera. I had a few friends over to assist in setup and filming.

Right before the smash, I spritzed the skull with water to further reduce its strength, increase its weight, and mitigate dust from the impact. The skull was aligned just off-center so more of the face would be visible in the shot. The ball was aligned just above the lower jaw in the hope that it would remain there as the top of the skull was obliterated. It worked perfectly.

SMASH

The shot could not have gone off any better. The face was pulverized, leaving the broken lower jaw almost where it stood. The skull tilted backward just as the lowest point wedged it against the ground. The point split it right down the center (along the grain direction), and the two halves of the cranium were sent flying in opposite directions. Smash.

The beautiful shots from five different cameras were assembled into a video, shown below.

Morning Star – The Most Metal Moment in 3D Printing

Thanks to ExOne and everyone else who helped me on this project, which may very well be the most Metal moment in 3D printing.

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