The 3D-printed Bra

Mardell models a 3D printed top with flexible elastomeric cups

3D printing is perfect for creating items perfectly fit for one person. It has already been applied successfully for prosthetic limbs, joint implantsorthopedic implants and inserts, orthotics, orthodontics, hearing aids, and many more advanced medical applications. Now that people with those rarer conditions have been helped, it’s time for 3D printing to move into applications that help the masses. 75–85% of women who wear bras are wearing the wrong size. By combining 3D scanning, custom software, and 3D printing, millions of women can live more comfortably. I am collaborating with two female industrial designers in Brooklyn who are working on just such a project, and I’m working on exploring a variety of other potential problems and solutions. Using scanning to determine size is very easy, but am taking on the much harder problem of matching and creating the desired curvature and structure. On September 21st, I showed an example design at World Maker Faire in New York that featured 3D-printed elastomeric cups. They are perfectly fit to the wearer using 3D scanning. In this case, the natural shape was ideal, and the function was only to support and preserve, with no shaping required. In cases where a sculpting of form is desired, there is an opportunity for benefit, but a fairly complicated geometry problem to achieve the perfect fit and comfort. I’m making good progress, and this project is tied in with others I’m working on, so expect to hear more about it very shortly.

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